Bahamas Kayak Camping Adventure

From
Exuma International Airport (GGT), Bahamas
Price
$2,495

50% deposit. Fully refundable up to 30 days out from the departure date. 

Based on double occupancy. Single Supplement Applies. $400

Duration
8 days, 7 nights
Duration

8 days, 7 nights

Skill Rating
2
From

Exuma International Airport (GGT), Bahamas

Accommodation
2 nights hotels, 5 nights camping
Price

$2495

50% deposit. Fully refundable up to 30 days out from the departure date. 

Based on double occupancy. Single Supplement Applies. $400

Minimum Age
9
"I thoroughly enjoyed every part of the trip. I felt like a true explorer and adventurist. This trip fulfilled one of my dreams. The company and bonding was the best. To Rick and Eric from the bottom of my inner soul, THANKS again for all your assistance. " -Tim H.

The Exuma Cays are an island-hopper’s dream. These tiny islands almost seem like they’re made for kayak camping. They have beautiful beaches and the shallow depth of the surrounding waters keeps boat traffic to a bare minimum. Out here you can find your secluded island paradise and let the Caribbean waves be the soundtrack to your beach campfire.

Day 1:    The trip officially begins in the Arrivals area at the Exuma International Airport (GGT) near George Town. You will meet your Northwest Passage guides there and then transfer to the evening’s accommodations. Before dinner, we will gather for welcome drinks and orient you to the area and answer any questions you may have about the itinerary.

Day 2:    Today we depart George Town and head northwest to Barre Terre, the launch site for our Exuma Cays kayaking adventure. After getting outfitted and packing our gear, we will get acquainted with our boats and begin the journey to our first campsite. Weather patterns will influence our route and where we choose to camp, but we will likely paddle 3-7 miles to our first beach campsite. (B, L, D)

Day 3:    After enjoying a beach camp breakfast we will explore the wonderful Exuma Cays waterways. The surrounding sea floor is quite shallow so it’s rare to encounter any watercraft outside of a few sea kayaks or small sailboats. Depending on the local weather patterns, we may choose to return to our same campsite as the night before or travel on to another island. (B, L, D)

Day 4:    Another day of paddling the turquoise Caribbean Sea and combing secluded white sand beaches awaits. When we aren’t paddling amongst the diminutive islands, we’ll enjoy spectacular snorkeling sessions, explore mangrove forests and spot some of the area’s very interesting wildlife including the endemic species of iguana, docile rays and the famous and cute swimming pigs of the Exumas. (B, L, D)

Day 5:    Once again, local weather will direct our exact paddling route, but conditions permitting we will continue our kayak journey northwest to some farther flung cays. Here we will find the endemic species of iguana and may get the chance to feed sea turtles. Gung ho paddlers will be able to reach “Thunderball Grotto,” an incredible snorkeling venue of 007 fame. ** (B, L, D)

Day 6:    Although the trip is far from over, our Caribbean camping adventure is nearing its close, so today we will set ourselves up for a comfortable return to Barre Terre where our paddling journey began. We will likely travel along the Brigantine Islands, a group of cays set in such shallow water that it’s possible to “hike” between them during low tide. (B, L, D)

Day 7:    We return to Barre Terre and bid farewell to the Exuma Cays. We transfer to our Great Exuma accommodations and enjoy a celebratory dinner on the Caribbean Sea. (B, L)

Day 8:    Your Northwest Passage guides will assist in airport transfers. (B)

*This is our intended itinerary.  As with any adventure, factors outside our control may alter the itinerary.

** We will be prepared to comply with the, as of now, required Rapid COVID-19 antigen testing to be administered 96 hours after arrival in country.

 

"I thoroughly enjoyed every part of the trip. I felt like a true explorer and adventurist. This trip fulfilled one of my dreams. The company and bonding was the best. To Rick and Eric from the bottom of my inner soul, THANKS again for all your assistance. " -Tim H.

The earliest arrival of humans in the islands now known as The Bahamas was in the first millennium AD. The first inhabitants of the islands were the Lucayans, an Arawakan-speaking Taino people, who arrived between about 500 and 800 AD from other islands of the Caribbean. Their ancestors came from mainland South America, where Arawakan-language peoples were present in most territories, and especially along the northeastern coast. Bahamian descendents were mostly from North and South Africa.