Family Porcupine Mountains, MI Backpacking & Camping

From
Ontonagon, MI
Price
$425

$325 (Under 18) Minimum Age 7

Duration
4 Days, 3 Nights

Upcoming dates

Kid Price
325
Duration

4 Days, 3 Nights

Skill Rating
1
From

Ontonagon, MI

Price

$425

$325 (Under 18) Minimum Age 7

Minimum Age
7
Included
Campsite permits, food, dishes and utensils, tents, instruction
Not Included
Transportation to/from location, personal gear including packs, park stickers

Bring the family along on this introductory backpacking trip to the scenic north woods of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. You’ll forget that you’re the Midwest as you hike the Lake Superior Shoreline amongst cascading waterfalls that plummet from the scenic bluffs of the Porcupine Mountains -- named by the Objibwe Native Americans for the resemblance to a porcupine when viewed in profile. This trip will take you through old growth forests, along scenic bluffs and winding rivers. It’s incredible how rejuvenated you feel returning to civilization after a few days living the simple life.

Day 1: We meet at park headquarters mid-afternoon. We'll make introductions, go over our route and the contents of our packs, and prepare to head out. Depending on availability and the composition of the group, we may stay in a rustic cabin the first night, or set up our tents at an easily accessible campsite.

Day 2 & 3: We break camp in the morning and pack up, hiking between 5 and 10 miles each day, taking plenty of time to enjoy the beauty of the woods and the spectacular views. We'll set up our tents in a new campsite each night, preparing dinner, relaxing around a campfire, and then curling up in our sleeping bags for a good night's rest.

Day 4: We break camp a final time, and head back toward civilization, putting down our packs and bidding farewell to our companions at about noon to return to our homes. **This itinerary is subject to change.

Near the shore of Lake Superior lies the Porcupine Mountains as referred to as the Porkies. According to the native Ojibwa people who name the mountains because their silhouette had the shape of a crouching porcupine.

History Trivia: The Mountains are home to the most extensive stand of old growth northern hardwood forest in North America.